The Episcopal Church in Native American Boarding Schools (1862-1905): Varieties of Assimilation through Transfer Narratives

Title

The Episcopal Church in Native American Boarding Schools (1862-1905): Varieties of Assimilation through Transfer Narratives

Description

"Within the context of Native American boarding schools, the main objective of the founding Christian churches and later the government was assimilation of students. That is to say, unlike the conventional definition of assimilation which involves recent arrivals adopting the cultural norms of a new homeland, the assimilative process of education in the boarding schools was designed so that children, already situated in their own homeland, gave up their distinctive culture and adopted the cultural norms of white settler society. Within boarding schools such assimilation consisted of eliminating the language, dress, cultural practices, and a unifying ethos of nationhood for Native American children,. In this thesis I will identify these assimilative practices and streams of thought in the Episcopal Church from the mid nineteenth century through the early years of the twentieth century."

Creator

Cotting, Jean A.

Publisher

Virginia Theological Seminary

Date

2020

Rights

@Copyright 2020 by Jean A. Cotting

Format

PDF

Language

English

Files

Cotting_Thesis.pdf
Cotting_Submission Permission.pdf
Date Added
May 18, 2020
Collection
VTS Master's Theses
Item Type
Text
Citation
Cotting, Jean A., “The Episcopal Church in Native American Boarding Schools (1862-1905): Varieties of Assimilation through Transfer Narratives,” Theses from Virginia Theological Seminary, accessed August 13, 2020, https://vtsbpl.omeka.net/items/show/36.